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LESSONS FROM THE WAY BACK MACHINE

LESSONS FROM THE WAY BACK MACHINE

Annual Report – Engineering.

This image illustrates two techniques that helped make an effective story telling image.

This location was very cluttered and messy. This is a common problem for location assignments, so try using a telephoto angle of view to eliminate the mess.  Additionally,  using a silhouette for one of the elements in the story can add to the overall effect of the image.

I started by identifying the visual elements of the story – arranging the elements with a telephoto angle of view to eliminate the mess and dirty clutter.

Next was to light the scene without showing any clutter. Lighting the engineer, the circuit board and antenna was first. A rear kicker light was added to the engineer for separation from the background. The subject of the testing was a large-scale object in the back. I decided not to light the object, but lit the walls behind it to create a silhouette. The engineer and the testing remained the prominent message.

Granted, the craft of photography (creating the view and lighting) can be time consuming. You must be mindful of the message and the reason for the image. You must create the mood and image quality that available light photography would never be able to match.

This image was created for an anniversary, retro issue report, captured with a Hasselblad and roughly 4000 watt seconds of flash power. All images were converted to black and white.  Nowadays, this could be executed with a high resolution DSLR, with a higher ISO and smaller lights. But, the concepts and techniques would be the same.

 

Gear:  Hasselblad, DynaLite and Norman flash.

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A Dual Use

A Dual Use

This was an accidental discovery that adds versatility to your Chimera beauty dish–  and getting more use from the same piece of gear is always a welcome benefit.  The transition of the collapsible beauty dish is shown here on a DynaLite Baja monolight.

The discovery happened during the disassembly of the beauty dish — when I removed 2 poles and then the opposing 2 poles, producing the strip configuration (photo #6).

It ain’t pretty and that’s ok, it produces another shape of light that makes this a versatile tool.

Here’s another solution, using this unit a a beauty dish, I often use the front diffusion on the bottom half only (photo #4)  to feather and reduce the light on the lower area of my subject.  This works great for your portrait subjects. 

I am always looking to create more utility from existing light sources.  This one is a great duality from a single light source.  I hope you find this helpful.  

Please follow Old Tricks For New Dogs for more creative solutions…..

Gear:  DynaLite Baja and Chimera 24″ Beauty Dish.

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Soft Light and Dynamic Color

Soft Light and Dynamic Color

Colorful Flowers – Soft Indirect Lighting set.

I learned this technique from a Nancy Brown book, Photographing People for Advertising. Nancy used this lighting to create intense color in a shot of people with colorful attire.

I incorporated this technique for my “food store flowers”, a perfect lighting technique for this subject.

All light coming from behind the subject was blocked by the black formica behind the flowers and the V-flats around the set. The camera shot through the small slit opening in the V-flats. The interior of the V-flats were white fabric to let the light “fall” onto the flowers.

 

Photo Progression

  1. start
  2. background light bouncing off of the white seamless
  3. added a 6x6 frame with diffusion to spread light – this and previous step to spread light with minimum distance
  4. black formica as background for flowers and a rig to hold the flower bouquet
  5. almost ready to shoot – add the flowers and close the front of the V-flats for a narrow opening to shoot through

Gear:
DynaLite Lighting, Chimera Panels and Frames for the V-flats and 6x6 diffusion panel, Olympus cameras and the flowers were from Safeway!

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Light Masking

Light Masking

Light Masking or a tale of three maskings.

Masking subjects for replacing the background can be very tedious.  As a photographer, you could leave that task for the graphic artist.  But if you, the photographer, supply the files with perfect clipping paths, you become a more valuable part of the creative team.

The masking challenges:

Subject 1–  stuffed animal with a feather – feather with delicate wisps.

L to R:  The set up on glass lets light show through all around subject  —  Main exposure for subject  —  Background exposure for mask  —  processed mask ready for Photoshop process.

Subject 2–  lantern – a subject with transparency

We want the background to come through the transparent areas and keep the inside and globe surface detail.

Here are some options.

Subject 3-  a location and studio shoot  –  This location shoot was canceled due to snow.

To complete this for a deadline,  I shot the skate park a day earlier than the snow fall and two days later, I shot the skate boarder in the studio.  With masking, we put this all together.

The Process

I have been using the Hensel FreeMask radio triggers on my Dynalite power packs for executing the two lighting exposures in this process.  They fire almost simultaneously.  Lighting is divided into, first for the subject, and then instantly the background.  You need the Hensel radios for this, especially for human subjects (camera set for minimum of 6 frames per second – 10 frames is better).  The two frames are processed in Photoshop.  See details at the links below.

Hensel linkhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UyfmAAfuf3o

The Processhttps://youtu.be/JdY_4-xhRs0

CAMERA- Olympus M1, LIGHTS- DynaLite,  RADIO TRIGGERING- Hensel Free Mask

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Cross Polarize

Cross Polarize

Cross Polarization of Plastic – Magic

I learned this way back at the beginning of my career, from a very technical photographer and one of the original Harmonicats – (goes back to the old Ed Sullivan Show days – look them up!).

This technique, I was told, is a way to check stress in plastic manufacturing. I adopted it as a creative tool.

The set up is a gel polarizing filter on a light box or light source. Position the plastic subject between your camera and the light. Add the polarizer filter on your lens and rotate until all the light from the source goes black. The light coming through the plastic gives you the magic swirls of color. I’ve used this on assignments as well as stock illustrations.  Great unique look and you always get asked, How did you do that!